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PURPOSE STATEMENT

 

ENABLED BY THE HOLY SPIRIT WE TAKE CHRIST TO ALL PEOPLE BY LOVING GOD, NEIGHBOR, AND SELF.

 

GUIDING PRINCIPLES:

 

  • We are guided by the principle that
    Since Jesus is our Lord and Savior we
    Pray

    To seek God’s guidance
  • We are guided by the principle that
    Since Jesus is our Lord and Savior we
    Accept

    the gifts of all and encourage everyone to use them in God’s mission
  • We are guided by the principle that
    Since Jesus is our Lord and Savior we
    Listen

    to the Holy Spirit and invite all to have a relationship with Jesus
  • We are guided by the principle that
    Since Jesus is our Lord and Savior we
    Serve

    the needs of all and strive to nurture and care for one another

 

Principle:

A general truth or law; basic to other truths.

            A settled law or rule of personal conduct.

 

 

Core Values

Guiding principles are core values and behaviors that will help us serve a useful role

in God’s mission.

  • Guiding principles (Pray, Accept, Listen, and Serve)
    will be available to us as we make decisions
  • Guiding principles (Pray, Accept, Listen, and Serve)
    will be with us in the midst of conflicts
  • Guiding principles (Pray, Accept, Listen, and Serve)
    will help us sort out which direction to go
  • Guiding principles (Pray, Accept, Listen, and Serve)
    will point us to good decisions and healthy actions

GUIDING PRINCIPLE FOCUS:

 

We are guided by the principle that
Since Jesus is our Lord and Savior we
Listen

to the Holy Spirit and invite all to have a relationship with Jesus

 

Master Builders Bible for Men

 

1 Kings 18 through 19:1-18

 

Characters:

 

Elijah

The prophet, a native of Tishbeh in Gilead, 1Ki 17:1.  His parentage and early history are unknown.  His bold faithfulness provoked the wrath of Ahab and Jezebel, especially when he threatened several years of drought and famine as a punishment for the sins of Israel, B. C. 908.

Ahab and Jezebel

Ahab, the sixth king of Israel, succeeded his father Omri B.C. 918, and reigned twenty-two years.  His wife was Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal, King of Tyre; an ambitious and passionate idolatress, through whose influence the worship of Baal and Ashtoreth was introduced in Israel.  Ahab erected in Samaria a house of Baal, and set up images of Baal and Ashtoreth; idolatry and wickedness became fearfully prevalent, and the king "did more to provoke the Lord to anger than all the kings that were before him."

Obadiah

The chief officer of King Ahab's household, who preserved the lives of one hundred prophets from the persecuting Jezebel, by concealing them in two caves and furnishing them with food.

 

Comment:         It seems incredible to me that after all of the dramatic events
                        in Elijah’s life;
                                    the raven feeding,

the food provided to the widow,

the raising of the widow’s son,

the fire for the sacrifice,

the forty day trip to Mt. Horeb

that Elijah could still have an image of God that was too small.

Elijah fell back on his own resources and realized that they were not
enough to accomplish the tasks that were given to him by God.

We do the same thing today.

Our God is too small and we rely on our own resources to try to do the tasks that God has already prepared us to do.

No wonder we feel inadequate and unable to work for God.


1 Kings 19:1-14

 

1 Kings 19:11-12

            The Lord said, “Go out and stand on the mountain in the presence of the Lord,
            for the Lord is about to pass by.”

Then a great and powerful wind tore the mountains apart and shattered the rocks before the Lord, but the Lord was not in the wind.

After the wind there was an earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake.

After the earthquake came a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire.

After the fire came a gentle whisper.

When Elijah heard it, he pulled his cloak over his face and went out and stood at the mouth of the cave.

Comment:         This passage always seems to make an impression on me.

                        In many ways I feel like I am waiting for some dramatic event to
                        happen that will demonstrate to me that I am actually hearing God’s word.

Sometimes even when there is a dramatic event I still fail to hear God’s word.

I need to constantly remind myself that most times God speaks to me in a whisper. To hear the whisper I must learn to be still, attentive, deliberate,

and develop a focus that will tune my hearing to that whisper.

 

Elijah was not listening.

Do you think that God lost faith in Elijah?

Do you ever think that God looses faith in us?


We are guided by the principle that
Since Jesus is our Lord and Savior we
Listen
to the Holy Spirit and invite all to have a relationship with Jesus

How Do We Invite?

 

Master Builders Bible for Men

 

Acts 2:1-41

 

Albert Barnes New Testament Commentary on Acts 2, verses 19-21:

Verse 19, 20.  I will show wonders. Literally, "I will give signs.". The word in the Hebrew, mophethim, means, properly, prodigies; wonderful occurrences; miracles wrought by God or his messengers. It is the common word to denote a miracle, in the Old Testament. Here it means, however, a portentous appearance, a prodigy, a remarkable occurrence. It is commonly joined in the New Testament with the word signs, "signs and wonders,” In these places it does not of necessity mean miracles, but unusual and remarkable appearances. Here it is fixed to mean great and striking changes in the sky, the sun, moon, etc. The Hebrew is, "I will give signs in the heavens, and upon the earth." Peter has quoted it according to the sense, and not according to the letter.

Much of the difficulty of interpreting these verses consists in fixing the proper meaning to the expression, "that great and notable day of the Lord." If it be limited to the day of Pentecost, it is certain that no such events occurred at that time. But there is, it is believed, no propriety in confining it to that time. The description here pertains to "the last days," (Ac 2:17) that is, to the whole of that period of duration, however long, which was known by the prophets as the last times. That period might be extended through many centuries; and during that period all these events would take place. The day of the Lord is the day when God shall manifest himself in a peculiar manner; a day when he shall so strikingly be seen in his wonders and his judgments, that it may be called his day. Thus it is applied to the day of judgment, as the day of the Son of man; the day in which he will be the great attractive object, and will be signally glorified. If, as I suppose, "that notable day of the Lord" here denotes that future time when God shall manifest himself in judgment, then we are not to suppose that Peter meant to say that these "wonders" should take place on the day of Pentecost, or had their fulfillment then; but would occur under that indefinite period called "the last days," the days of the Messiah, and BEFORE that period was closed by the great day of the Lord. The gift of tongues was a partial fulfillment of the general prophecy pertaining to those times. And as the prophecy was thus partially fulfilled, it was a pledge that it would be entirely fulfilled; and thus there was laid a foundation for the necessity of repentance, and for calling on the Lord in order to be saved.

Blood. Blood is commonly used as an emblem of slaughter, or of battle.

 

Fire. Fire is also an image of war, or the conflagration of towns and dwellings in time of war.

 

Vapour of smoke. The word vapour means, commonly, an exhalation from the earth, etc., easily moved from one place to another, here it means (Heb. Joel) rising columns, or pillars of smoke; and is another image of the calamities of war, the smoke rising from burning towns. It has almost always been customary in war to burn the towns of an enemy, and to render him as helpless as possible, Hence the calamities denoted here are those represented by such scenes. To what particular scenes there is reference here, it may be impossible now to say. It may be remarked, however, that scenes of this kind occurred before the destruction of Jerusalem; and there is a striking resemblance between the description in Joel, and that by which our Savior foretells the destruction of Jerusalem.

 

Comment:

 

Joel

Not much is known about Joel’s life or even when he lived. One commentator thought he might have lived during the fifth or fourth century B.C. when the Persian Empire was prominent.

What did survive of Joel’s life was the message he delivered concerning the coming of God’s judgment and the pouring out of the Holy Spirit.

 

Acts 2, Verse 33:         [Jesus] Exalted to the right hand of God, he has received

from the Father the promised Holy Spirit and has poured out

what you now see and hear.

 

Jesus received the Holy Spirit from God and now he pours it out on us.

 

The Challenge

Are we as confident and bold as Peter was in this passage?

If not, what do we need to do individually to get closer to where Peter was?

Is that a challenge to you and are you willing to accept that challenge?

 

What is a relationship with Jesus?

 

Funk & Wagnalls Standard Dictionary

Relationship:     The state of being related; connection;

kin, as in members of the same family

 

This definition strongly suggests that a ‘relationship with Jesus’

is way more than a casual acquaintance.

 

Before we can ‘invite all to have a relationship with Jesus’,

we need to examine our own ‘relationship’ with Jesus.

Do we have a connection with Jesus?

How strong or weak is that connection?

What can we do to make our relationship with Jesus better

so that we can boldly invite others to have a relationship with Jesus?

 

Find ways in your own life and daily activities

to be guided by the principle or basic truth that
since Jesus is our Lord and Savior we
Listen

to the Holy Spirit and invite all to have a relationship with Jesus.

 

Periodically re-assess your core values and behaviors.
Develop attitudes and habits, like deliberate prayer and Bible study,

to help keep ‘the word of the Lord’ fresh in our thoughts, emotions, and wills (hearts).

 

ENABLED BY THE HOLY SPIRIT let the GUIDING PRINCIPLES of

PRAYING, ACCEPTING, LISTENING, and SERVING

 

be available to us as we make decisions,

be with us in the midst of conflicts,

help us sort out which direction to go,

and point us to good decisions and healthy actions.

 

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